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Long live King Rama X

Posted by hasekamp on 29 November 2016 at 12:06 PM
The National Legislative Assembly (NLA) president Pornpetch Wichitcholchai convened a special meeting on Tuesday and has now announced the acknowledgement of the Cabinet's resolution to invite HRH Crown Prince Maha Vajiralongkorn to accede to the throne. "The NLA, which now functions as the Parliament. has received the Cabinet's resolution. The NLA president will now invite the Crown Prince to accede to the throne and become the next King of Thailand," Pornpetch said. The 5-minute meeting was attended by 243 lawmakers out of 250 NLA members. At the end of the session, Pornpetch asked the attending lawmakers to stand up in a show of respect to "the new King". The meeting was held under Section 2 of the interim constitution. under which the cabinet submits the heir's name for acknowledgement. The interim charter's Section 2 refers to Section 23 of the 2007 constitution. According to Section 23, if the throne is vacant and the late King has appointed the heir in accordance with the 1924 royal law, the cabinet should notify the Parliament president (in the case, the NLA president) for acknowledgement.The president then convenes a meeting to notify the parliament before he formally invites the heir to step up to the throne. (Source: The Nation)


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Royal family Tree

Posted by hasekamp on 28 November 2016 at 13:48 PM
The Royal Family Tree is about 15m-tall. It stands in the forest of Kui Buri National Park in Prachuap Khiri Khan, 280km south of Bangkok. Its branches spread out, but they do not have a single leaf. The tree is dead, and it is one of 12 lifeless-yet-standing mai chan hom, known commonly as kalamet, a fragrant and auspicious tree to be cut and then used as a material in the royal funeral of His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej which is expected to take place late next year. Mai chan hom is a royal tree," said Anandha Chuchoti, director-general of the Fine Arts Department. "It is our tradition to use the tree for making royal urns for kings or royal families. It is a custom that can be traced back to the Ayutthaya period." Historical records show that kalamet -- which is sometimes confused with its relative sandalwood -- was first used for the cremation of King Naresuan in the 17th century. In addition to making royal urns, the wood from mai chan hom was also used throughout history for the construction of Phra Merumat, or the royal crematorium, the palace-like structure in which the royal urn is housed. "The royal urn and Phra Merumat for His Majesty must be grand and majestic," said Anandha, adding that the design has been completed by its Office of Traditional Arts. The department expects to have kalamet boards delivered from Kui Buri National Park to the Office of Traditional Arts in Nakhon Pathom by December. The construction of the royal crematorium will begin in February, said the director-general. Phra Merumat will be built on the grounds of Sanam Luang, a vast green field to the north of the Grand Palace. A spiritual as well as historical landmark of the city, Sanam Luang has been used as the funeral ground of kings, queens, princes and princesses since the beginning of the present Chakri dynasty of the Rattanakosin era. The last time Bangkok saw a royal funeral pyre was at the cremation of Her Royal Highness Princess Bejraratana Rajasuda in April 2012. But the royal cremation of His Majesty the King will be a majestic farewell unprecedented in scale and historical gravity. The last time a Thai king was cremated was 66 years ago, when King Ananda Mahidol was cremated in March 1950 at Sanam Luang. The exact spot will be announced within the second week of January, according to the Deputy Prime Minister Gen Tanasak Patimapragorn, the chairman of the committee supervising the construction. (Source: The Bangkok Post)


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Blueprint of Royal Funeral Pyre ready

Posted by hasekamp on 28 November 2016 at 13:35 PM
The Fine Arts Department has revealed the blueprint of the funeral pyre for King Bhumibol Adulyadej, with construction scheduled to start in January. Department director-general Anandha Chuchoti said on Monday that the structure for the funeral of the King will be 50.49 metres high, built on the ground with ponds at four corners. The ponds will display models of the Chai Pattana Foundation wind turbines, he added. The design of the royal pyre illustrates the imagery of Mount Sumeru, he said after a meeting of the royal pyre building committee at Government House. The sacred mountain is where the King's divine spirit will return to, according to Buddhist belief. Deputy Prime Minister Tanasak Patimapragorn, who chairs the committee, said the area where the royal pyre will be built at Sanam Luang will be sealed off for construction on Jan 10. (Source: The Bangkok Post)


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Large event on December 5

Posted by hasekamp on 28 November 2016 at 13:31 PM
THE Tourism Authority of Thailand will oversee a special event in Bangkok next month to mark the birthday anniversary of His Majesty the late King Bhumibol Adulyadej. The December 5 event at Bhumibol Bridge will feature the song "Klai Rung" ("Near Dawn"), which was composed by the King, the Royal Anthem and a Buddhist prayer, said Deputy Prime Minister General Tanasak Patimapragorn yesterday. The event, to be held in the morning, will end with a mass release of balloons and a merit-making ritual in which food and commodity items will be given to 999 monks before the event's ends at 11am.The bridge and nearby roads will be closed during proceedings. As for New Year's Eve celebrations, Tanasak said ministries, the Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) and agencies would host cross-year prayers at temples nationwide as well as some temples abroad, while 14 border provinces will organise Asean cross-year prayers. (Source: The Nation)


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Lopburi monkey festival 2016

Posted by hasekamp on 28 November 2016 at 13:19 PM
Lopburi without the usual feasting table or traditional dances. The organisers said the modest celebration was to show respect for the mourning period. The monkey feast is always held on the last Sunday in November. (Source: The Nation, video published under standard YouTube licence) Click for video


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No fireworks for Loy Krathong

Posted by hasekamp on 16 November 2016 at 12:03 PM
PEOPLE celebrated the Loy Krathong Festival in a quieter atmosphere than normal last night as the country is still mourning the passing of King Bhumibol, and no fireworks or sky lanterns were allowed in Bangkok. However, Loy Krathong this year coincided with the "Super Moon" natural phenomenon, the full moon yesterday was the closest to the Earth in 68 years. The phenomenon was a major attraction worldwide, and the National Astronomical Research Institute of Thailand set up telescopes at three venues and at many schools around the country for people to watch the bright moon. Pol Colonel Kritsana Pattanacharoen, deputy spokesman for the Royal Thai Police, said people were free to enjoy Loy Krathong but entertainment should be arranged carefully to suit the mourning period and all kinds of fireworks were strictly banned. "National police chief Pol General Chakthip Chaijinda has ordered police officers nationwide to step up security during the festival [last night] and until now there has been no sign of any mishap," Kritsana said late yesterday. "People are urged not to light any fireworks and sky lanterns or they will be punished with a fine of up to Bt60,000 or up to three years in prison, according to NCPO order 27/2559. The police will also strictly enforced the law against illegal motorcycle racing during the Loy Krathong Festival as well." Venues reopen. All entertainment venues were allowed to reopen starting last night, but Kritsana said operators still had to ensure entertainment was appropriate while the country mourns for the late King. He also asked parents who planned to take children to the festival to write down their names and contact numbers on notes that the children carried in case they got lost, which would make it easier to reunite them with parents. Pol Maj-General Songpol Watthanachai, deputy police spokesman, said there were 436 piers in Bangkok where people could celebrate Loy Krathong, but 70 of them were regarded as unsafe. Four piers near the Grand Palace Tha Chang, Tha Phrachan, Tha Tien and Tha Maharaj were closed. (Source: The Nation)


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Late King to be called King Bhumibol The Great

Posted by hasekamp on 16 November 2016 at 11:35 AM
The government plans to honour His Majesty the late King with the title "the Great" after the conclusion of royal funeral rites, Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha said Tuesday. Gen Prayut stressed that the royal funeral rites must be concluded before the matter can go forward. The cabinet must first approve the title and forward it to the Royal Household Bureau for endorsement, he said. Gen Prayut said the government has long considered honouring the late King with the title "the Great", but it must wait for an appropriate time. The prime minister also said the major events calendar will be changed when the next king ascends the throne and it is up to the Royal Household Bureau to decide on the matter. However, Gen Prayut said he believes the dates and events on the calendar relating to the late King Rama IX will be retained in his memory, although the events may be renamed. Major calendar events relating to the late King include Coronation Day on May 5, and his birthday on Dec 5 which had previously been celebrated every year. Gen Prayut also said he was proud to have worked both as a soldier and as prime minister for His Majesty the King, and that he had been impressed with what the King had done for the country and the people during his 70-year reign. Interior Minister Anupong Paojinda said City Hall and the government's situation-monitoring centre are expected to temporarily seal off the whole Sanam Luang area some time after New Year so the Fine Arts Department can move in to construct the royal crematorium. The situation-monitoring centre will find new areas for mourners coming to pay their respects to the late King in the Grand Palace when Sanam Luang becomes off-limits, he said. The World Health Organisation (WHO) Thailand on Tuesday posted on its Facebook page an eight-minute, 37-second clip featuring contributions His Majesty the late King had made to public health in Thailand. "For all of us at WHO, His Majesty is an inspiration, as he should be for all other leaders. His leadership and strong commitment to public health exemplified the most fundamental principle of Health for All People, and set a high standard to which we should all strive and build upon. "His Majesty was a significant role model nationally and globally in addressing the most pressing public health issues of his time. Kamol Rodklai, secretary-general of the Office of the Education Council, said a committee has been set up to compile the late King's speeches and remarks on education during various occasions. It has been found that the late King gave more than 3,000 speeches related to education during his 70-year reign. The committee will narrow them down to 89 for publication in 5,000 books and on 35,000 CDs for distribution to educational institutions, Mr Kamol said.(Source: The Bangkok Post)


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Ceremony for felling trees

Posted by hasekamp on 14 November 2016 at 16:56 PM
PEOPLE could witness a sacred ritual at the Kui Buri National Park today before the felling of four agarwood trees chosen for the royal crematorium. The ritual took place between 2.09pm and 2.39pm on Monday, November 14, 2016. It begun as soon as His Majesty's Deputy Principal Private Secretary Wud Sumitra poured holy water and anoints the No 15 agarwood tree at the park to the sound of holy music from gongs and other instruments. Chatchai Pinngern, chief of the Brahmin rituals office, will also take part in the ceremony, reading out loud the worship script and chopping the tree with a golden axe. The royal astrologer was present to sound the gong and three other chosen agarwood trees were cut at the same time. The sacred ritual was recorded by the National Archive of Thailand. (Source: The Nation)


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Film with Royal Anthem ready

Posted by hasekamp on 14 November 2016 at 16:50 PM
New Royal Anthem film was released Monday morning on TV pool. The film was recorded during a historic mass singing event on October 22 when hundreds of thousands people gathered to sing the Royal Anthem in tribute to HM the late King at Sanam Luang. Film and music masters MC Chatrichalerm Yukol and Somtow Sucharitkul collaborated to produce the new film. The film will be shown in movie theatres and on television from now on. The film can be seen on http://www.nationmultimedia.com/video/play/8470 (Source: The Nation)


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Still masses of mourners on Sanam Luang

Posted by hasekamp on 7 November 2016 at 12:27 PM
TENS of thousands of mourners waited patiently in long lines that criss-crossed Sanam Luang yesterday in an attempt to bid farewell and pay respect. The number of people was higher than during last week. Officials had to open the entrance for mourners to go inside the Palace before the usual opening at 5am. And it closed at 9pm. Deputy Bangkok Governor Amnuay Nimmano said in a press briefing that activities that were not linked to facilitating mourners were no longer allowed on Sanam Luang. The order "banning hair cutting, massage, painting and handmade printing services" came from the national command centre, Amnuay said. The First Army Region will establish subcommittees to maintain order on the site as more people are expected to come for the graduation commencement ceremony at Thammasat University, which is close to Sanam Luang, next weekend, plus the Loy Kratong festival on November 14. (Source: The Nation)


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Rice scheme extended

Posted by hasekamp on 7 November 2016 at 12:20 PM
The National Rice Policy Committee is expected to launch its new subsidy scheme Monday for glutinous paddy and Pathum Thani fragrant paddy to buffer any impact on prices of a surge in supply of as much as 25 million tonnes in the next few months. Teerapat Prayurasiddhi, Agriculture and Cooperatives Ministry permanent secretary, said the new supply of white paddy is the priority for discussion of Monday's meeting of the National Rice Policy Committee, chaired by Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha. Prices of white paddy recently dropped to between 7,200-7,500 baht per tonne, down from 9,400 baht per tonne in June, he said, adding that without suitable measures, the new supply could put more pressure on rice prices. Wiboonlasana Ruamraksa, permanent secretary for commerce, said up to 25 million tonnes of paddy will be harvested in the next few months. Of the total, 10.7 million tonnes will be Hom Mali, followed by glutinous paddy and other varieties of white paddy. The planned relief measure will focus on rice other than Hom Mali paddy for which the government has already issued subsidy measures. The new measure will be similar to the current storage-pledging programme for Hom Mali paddy, which was approved last week by the cabinet. Intended to encourage farmers to store rice in their own barns to delay releasing new supply to the market, the government will pay a subsidy of 13,000 baht per tonne to participating growers of Hom Mali grain. Of the total, 9,500 baht, which is equal to 90% of the market price for the grain, is for farmers to store their paddy in barns for a certain period of time. (Source: The Bangkok Post)


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Trees suffer from grievers

Posted by hasekamp on 5 November 2016 at 15:38 PM
ABOUT 200 tamarind trees around Sanam Luang, many of which are more than a century old, appear to be withering due to excessive water and food scraps disposed of near their roots. Deputy Bangkok Governor Jakkaphan Phiew-ngarm said yesterday that help was now being given to these affected trees. The volumes of waste have been huge given the more than 1.5 million people who have entered Sanam Luang in recent weeks to pay respects to the revered King Bhumibol Adulyadej. Most people are using rubbish bins or bags, but others unthinkingly are throwing leftover drinks or soup on the trees. Since His Majesty's passing on October 13, his body has been resting at the Grand Palace opposite Sanam Luang, or the so-called Royal Grounds, with thousands flocking to the area both day and night. The Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) has urged mourners around Sanam Luang to make sure they do not harm the trees.The network of people protecting the trees today coordinated with the BMA's Environment Depart-ment to campaign for guarding the historical tamarind trees. (Source: The Nation)


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Wood selected for Royal Cremation

Posted by hasekamp on 5 November 2016 at 15:30 PM
The Royal Household Bureau has selected four out 19 sandalwood varieties from Kui Buri National Park in Prachuap Khiri Khan to be used in the royal cremation ceremony for His Majesty the late King Bhumibol Adulyadej at Sanam Luang, a wildlife official said. Representatives from the bureau, including a Brahmin astrologer, visited Kui Buri National Park in Prachuap Khiri Khan to look at sandalwood trees, Yanyong Lekavijit, director of Protected Area Regional Office 3, under the Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation, said on Friday. Kui Buri National Park in Kui Buri district is home to a variety of sandalwoods which are used in royal cremation ceremonies and religious rites, Mr Yangyong said. Officials offered a total of 19 fragrant woods and representatives selected four mature trees to be used in the royal cremation ceremony, he added. (Source: The Bangkok Post)


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